What’s Driving Yahoo Growth in Online Video?

Yahoo showed a fairly large increase in last month’s online-video viewing. How? I’ll give you a hint: it’s news.

Since most of the monthly comScore data is predictable, the blogs have jumped on this… Search Engine Watch called it “colassel as a giant squid,” and TubeFilter called it “massive.”

While 20% growth on a low base isn’t perhaps “colossal” or “massive,” it is impressive for Yahoo. Yahoo always fancied itself as a portal, hence its loss of audience to search-engine giant Google. In early 2000s I would have expected Yahoo to be the rightful owner of the online-video battle. But it hasn’t captured online video despite many attempts.

Now Yahoo has bumped Vevo out for the #3 position last month. Sure, the audience bar chart shows a steep cliff after Google sites (YouTube). YouTube streamed about 50% of the 40 billion video views in February (and has about 3x the viewers of its nearest competitors). But Yahoo’s growth still warrants some exploration.

Abc yahoo2 200x160

So what’s going on with Yahoo? Pick below:

a. Yahoo could be doing a better job of convincing its 177 million unique monthly viewers to consume video.

b. Yahoo announced a slate of new comedy programs, and launched the Screen, although these unlikely impacted last month.

c. Yahoo and ABC News partnered in October 2011. That deal accounts for almost half of the news videos watched by U.S. Internet viewers in February… that puts the ABC/Yahoo duo above MSNBC and CNN.

(Hint: pick c, or abc).

News is the new viral, kids.

 

NBC Brings Advertisers & Creators Together “From Start” for Web Series: Everything New is Old Again

TubeFilter, which tracks the “best scripted web series,” reports that NBC Universal Digital Studio will create a slate of new original web series to be produced with 60 Frames Entertainment.

NBC promises to bring the “most talented writers and producers in entertainment” in efforts to “create a much higher-quality production value than what is normally associated with digital production.” The Studio’s “innovative new business model” will bring advertisers and content producers together “from the start.”

This is significant news, folks, for two reasons. First, it’s signs that NBC continues to be the leading network for online evolution. Second, it’s a novel approach for online-video, but based on a model that has proven itself over time.

It won’t be pain free, but could change online video in meaningful ways. If NBC’s muscle can keep creators and advertisers in a room and force them to cooperate, then we may see something far more interesting than Hulu shows with interstitial forced ads. Products woven into plotlines, product placement… it’s not new, folks.

As much as a like product integration, I just want to be the next Ed McMahon. Anyone keeping a list of the products he’s pimped?