How to Memorize Anything Quickly: 10 Memory “Pegs”

Having trouble remembering a list of to-do items or concepts for a presentation? Preparing for a test, and need a fast way to remember a bunch of things? You need mnemonics!

Mnemonic guide to remember ten things easily

In today’s UncleNalts “YouTube Orbit” video (subscribe here, folks, for daily nonsense) I reveal a mnemonic device that will help you remember ten things. Here’s a visual depiction of your “pegs,” or devices on which you’ll hang/store what you want to remember. You’ll need to memorize this list first, but each item rhymes with the number it represents.

The key is to create a vivid, action-oriented, weird image or scene to connect what you’re trying to memorize to these ten images (which you’ll only have to learn once, and keep for life).

Example: So if you’re trying to remember to pick up dry cleaner’s as your fourth image… you need a WILD way to connect dry cleaner’s to item four (door).

Wrong way: Picturing yourself walking into the dry cleaner’s via the door is not going to work. Instead, try something freaky.

Right way: Imagine that you’re picking up your shirts, but the dry cleaner’s is giving you one shirt at a time… requiring you to walk through a series of doors that are vibrating. On each door is one of your shirts hanging on the door knob. You get into a fight with the dry cleaner because you’re frustrated with how cumbersome it is to pick up your shirts. THAT you’ll remember.

Viacom’s Top-Ten Rejected Claims on Google

Viacom Knows What You Did Last Summer.

Holy shit. According to this Wired article, a judge ruled yesterday (Wednesday, July 2, 2008) that Google will have to turn over every record of every video watched by YouTube users, including users’ names and IP addresses, to Viacom. The order also requires Google to turn over copies of all videos that it has taken down for any reason.

Viacom is suing Google for allowing clips of its copyright videos to appear on YouTube, and wants the data to prove that infringing material is more popular than user-created videos, which could be used to increase Google’s liability if it is found guilty of contributory infringement.

Google argued that turning over the data would invade its users’ privacy, but the judge’s ruling (see pdf of ruling) described that argument as “speculative” and ordered Google to turn over the logs on a set of four tera-byte hard drives. The Electronic Frontier Foundation has already reacted, calling the order a violation of the Video Privacy Protection act that “threatens to expose deeply private information.”

The judge, in fairness, denied Viacom’s request for:

  1. YouTube’s source code, and the code for identifying repeat copyright infringement uploads
  2. Copies of all videos marked private and Google’s advertising database schema
  3. Chad Hurley and Steven Chen’s nuts on a silver platter
  4. Viacom CEO Philippe Dauman’s son Philippe Douman Jr (who works for Google) taking over as CEO for YouTube.
  5. The letter G removed from the alphabet.
  6. The internet being turned off until said disputes are settled
  7. A return to 1990 when big media had a profitable business model.
  8. Perpetualy indemnification from taxes by Viacom, its employees and any individual or company selected by the Viacom board.
  9. Eleven virgins for each Viacom senior executive.
  10. Viacom Day to replace 4th of July holiday.