NBC Brings Advertisers & Creators Together “From Start” for Web Series: Everything New is Old Again

TubeFilter, which tracks the “best scripted web series,” reports that NBC Universal Digital Studio will create a slate of new original web series to be produced with 60 Frames Entertainment.

NBC promises to bring the “most talented writers and producers in entertainment” in efforts to “create a much higher-quality production value than what is normally associated with digital production.” The Studio’s “innovative new business model” will bring advertisers and content producers together “from the start.”

This is significant news, folks, for two reasons. First, it’s signs that NBC continues to be the leading network for online evolution. Second, it’s a novel approach for online-video, but based on a model that has proven itself over time.

It won’t be pain free, but could change online video in meaningful ways. If NBC’s muscle can keep creators and advertisers in a room and force them to cooperate, then we may see something far more interesting than Hulu shows with interstitial forced ads. Products woven into plotlines, product placement… it’s not new, folks.

As much as a like product integration, I just want to be the next Ed McMahon. Anyone keeping a list of the products he’s pimped?

Author: Nalts

Hi. I'm Nalts.

9 thoughts on “NBC Brings Advertisers & Creators Together “From Start” for Web Series: Everything New is Old Again”

  1. Ed McMahon? I’d settle for Willie Mays. Forget that, I’ll be that homeless guy outside the downtown McDonalds who’s always wearing the Coca-Cola hat. You KNOW it’s not a coincidence that Homeless George happens to wear a hat for the same soda product line of the place he sits outside of every day. And he never asks for change. Pretty unusual for a homeless guy. $20 says he’s on the Berkshire Hathaway payroll.

    I would love to have a one-day meeting with an advertising executive and a marketing exec. Put together a plan to turn my dumpy little channel into something worth watching. I’ve had two people tell me in the last week that I should be “getting paid” to do what I do on YouTube, and if I could figure out a way to snooker some advertisers into jumping on my ship, I would.

    In a few weeks, I’ll officially have over a million views on all my videos combined. No, it’s not a Naltesque 34 trillion or whatever you’ve got, but a million views sounds pretty good all the same. So go help my cause and click my freakin’ name already!

  2. Thanks for the quote Nalts. We are trying to put together a little snarky comment contest to see who can “best” pair brands with the new slate of NBC-60Frames web shows. We’d love to hear your contribution.

    As for brand integration, hopefully we won’t have to endure repeat performances of TNT’s product placement nightmare micro-series ‘Lucky Chance.’ Check out our review by Alec McNayr:

    “TNT Went All-In on ‘Lucky Chance’ and Busted”
    http://news.tubefilter.tv/2008/07/24/tnt-went-all-in-on-lucky-chance-and-busted-2/

    Drew Baldwin
    Editor, Tubefilter

  3. What this world needs, more human billboards. I just don’t see enough advertising

    I have a question, how much would a company have to pay you to tattoo their product on your head?

  4. Fame is like crack, if you don’t know when to stop or get the hell out you ‘ll end up wetting yourself in public or dead too soon. I think I’m right, maybe not

  5. Poor Ed McMahon. He’ll soon be living in the back seat of his Bentley (a good car to live in) parked on the fifth level of The Beverly Center parking garage like that other movie star, whatshername. Might’ve been different had he been born with a chin, but alas, he’s doomed.

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